Event: Tokyo Auto Salon 2011 – RH9

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Describing RH9 in one word would be easy; Power.  The Record Holder 9 club is exclusive to those cars capable of running 9’s in the quarter mile, the 1320, 0-400m; whatever you wanna call it, these things can do it fast.  Once confined only to GT-R’s, it seems like they’ve expanded to other platforms as well; like the almighty Garage G Force X above.  When you think of Japanese tuning, you’ll probably think of a few companies that take part in this club; and you’ll see some of their creations here.  It’s not uncommon to see RH9 badged parts created by these companies as well.  When I picked through these, I realized a lot were on the CF card that had failed on me.  As a result I’m missing some (unhappy face).  There are a few other sites though that have coverage of the RH9 too, so all is well.  Enjoy.

Close Up: Yellow Factory EG6

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I think that this may have been the most overlooked car at the Salon; no exaggeration.  I actually did a double take when I saw this because I couldn’t believe an EG6 was at Auto Salon in the year 2011.  Aside from the actual Honda booth, finding a tuned Honda (other than a CR-Z) at this years Salon was like finding a needle in a haystack; if the hay were made out of Nissans and Toyotas.  After drifting blew up, the market obviously gravitated toward S-Chassis’ and the like.  RWD engulfed Honda’s FWD prior dominance and left them to the devoted few.  After I came to my senses I decided that I needed to spend a few moments with this thing.  Check out more past the break.

Event: Tokyo Auto Salon 2011 v.3

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I hope you guys are still with me on this coverage!  I know it’s taking awhile, but I’m busy with work.  I’ll begin this post with a few shots of this slammed R33 clad in an anime livery.  To my surprise, there were a lot of ‘Itasha’ styled cars at the Salon.  For those who are unaware of this movement, Itasha is a term used to describe the otaku fad of modifying cars in an anime or manga theme; mainly with giant decals on the exterior.  I’ve already admitted to my liking it for reasons unknown to me.  It’s become quite popular in Japan recently, and there are regularly held meets throughout Tokyo.  This particular Skyline was wrapped in 萌えコレ!(Moe Colle) vinyl.  三栄書房 (San-Ei Shobo) is a huge Japanese magazine publisher.  If you’re a fan of this car, check out the wallpaper section.  Click past the break for more.

Event: Tokyo Auto Salon 2011 v.2

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After an hour or so I seemed to get my bearings around the gigantic convention center, and realized the scope of what laid ahead of me.  To cover a show of this magnitude on my own would take some serious moving around; so I did just that.  Keeping an eye out for certain booths I really wanted to see, I set out on a mission to cover as much as the show as I could.  I found out that the two other halls held more of the stuff I was looking for.  The next two posts will contain some spectacular builds from the tuners we all know and love.  Check it out past the break.

Event: Tokyo Auto Salon 2011 v.1

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Tokyo Auto Salon is a sort of misleading name for this event.  If we could modify the title to something like, ‘Tokyo Model Salon’, it would read more accurate.  Seriously, you couldn’t get a mile away from any car if there was a model in front of it.  As soon as a girl appeared, a mob of hormonally charged Japanese men would crowd so close that I couldn’t get anywhere near the booth to shoot the car.  Because of this, my coverage isn’t as organized as I would have wanted, but I’ll try my best to post in the directions in which I walked.  OK, with all that out of the way, I will say that this show was nothing short of epic.  It was my first time attending and I wasn’t disappointed in the least.  Sure, there were 30 billion people there, but it just added to the atmosphere.  In the posts to follow I’ll do my best to cover not just cars, but booth and product displays as well.  Click past the break for more.

Close Up: Streets Nissan March

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OK, so I didn’t realize just how many photos that I have to sift through and edit.  I ended up taking close to 20 Gigs this last trip, and I’ve just arrived at my apartment to start sorting them.  I would have had some coverage up sooner, but the last part of my vacation was spent with family.  So while I get some posts of TAS together, I’ll let you munch of this for a little while.  We spotted this March walking back from Autobacs.  It was actually at a Nissan dealership; maybe the owner works there.  It had some tasteful mods, which is fairly common for these kei cars, but since we don’t have these in the states, thought I’d grab some shots.  Click past the break for more.

Feature: Keihin Real Racing HSV-010 GT

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When Honda announced the end of the NSX’s participation in the Super GT  due to new regulations only allowing front-engine, rear-driven cars, fans around the world winced a little.  Little did we know what Honda had cooking in their chemistry lab of motorsport awesomeness.  They announced their new GT spec car towards the end of 2009 as a successor to the popular mid-engined NSX, that was to compete in the GT-500 class in 2010.  I believe there were four teams that utilized the HSV; Epson, Weider, Autobacs, and Keihin.  Of these teams, Keihin managed the best performance of the season.  You can watch the race at Sportsland Sugo here; the spectacular ending, and win for the Keihin team, was a highlight of this season.  This win helped them to acheive 3rd place in the championship.  If that’s not enough HSV-ness, click over to JDM Clips to see the Keihin HSV in action in Motegi.  Thanks to JDM Clips for some great shots.

Action: Mugen Circuit Challenge S2000

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Ever wonder what it would feel like to fly around Tsukuba, strapped into a Mugen built machine, driven by a former F1 driver and current Super GT driver?  If so, the Mugen Circuit Challenge at Tsukuba Circuit is the place you need to go.  Taka from JDM Clips sent these images over to help us get as close as we can to the action.  He has attended this event multiple times, and really has a feel for what a company like Mugen can achieve.  Perfectly matching power output with chassis limitations, Mugen can take performance to an entirely new level.  Having a reliable car equipped with parts that work in harmony with the chassis is ideal for maintaining control on track; and Mugen does just that.  Most people don’t realize just how much experience Mugen has in building cars and engines.  Click past the break for more on-track shots.