Tag: アタック

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Event: Attack Championship 2019 – Tsukuba Stage V.1

It takes a dedicated enthusiast to consider time attack a spectator sport; and trust me, I don’t say that lightly.  I’ve spent almost a good portion of my life promoting the sport, the last thing I want to do is discredit my own work.  That’s not my sole opinion though, it is simply a statement that is rooted in factuality.  Unlike other mediums in motor sport, time attack is more of an intrinsic, individual type of racing when compared to wheel to wheel events.  It’s something you’d rather be doing than watching.  At the top levels, the tracks are somewhat deserted in order to give the driver a clear shot in getting the fastest lap possible – having no traffic is essential.

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Encounter: An Absence Justified – The TFR FD Returns

It’s been some time since the paddocks of Japan’s most credible race tracks have been graced with the presence of Ejima Kiyotaka and his TFR built FD3S.  This year, changed all that, as the Attack Tsukuba Championship played host to his return, and the unveiling of his newly rebuilt FD.  I wouldn’t say that Kiyotaka ever cut corners with this car, and it’s performance to date backs that up.  Low 56 second lap times are no joke at Tsukuba; but he wanted more from the car.  To achieve the performance he demanded, he would need to take a step back from competing.

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Event: Driven To Perfection – Attack Tsukuba Championship 2018

The uniqueness of time attack as a motor sport comes in the form of precise continuity.  If the slightest error is made anywhere on the track, the moment of contention is lost.  Many times there exists only one chance, where conditions are aligned, that the drivers who live on the limit are able to achieve record laps.  There is a feeling of tension, exclusive to the sport that makes it so appealing to it’s participants and fans.  Man and machine working together harmoniously, becoming one, in an unforgiving waltz that carries them to the peak of their abilities.

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Feature: Title Fight – The ASM S2000

There are so many cool builds in the paddock of any given Attack event in Japan, that I often fail to acknowledge just how in-depth some of the builds are.  As the sport progresses, and the participants seek to go faster and faster, their machines eventually begin to become a reflection of their drive.  Putting budget aside, I’d have to say that the ASM Yokohama S2000 is one of the premiere examples of this idea.  This particular build, which ASM has been developing for over a decade, all but reached the peak of it’s very active life in the last weekend of February.

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Close-Up: Yusuke Tokue – The Vanguard of FF

The Garage Work camp has been hard at work on several of their shop cars for the 2018 season.  Iwata has chosen to put his personal build aside in order to concentrate on the advancement of a few select customers; which is a somewhat noble, but necessary thing to do when you own your own tuning shop.  The dedication is paying off though, as all 3 of the cars they have competing have broken personal records.  One of them stands out among the rest, however, and it all started last year when he broke a very important record at Tsukuba.

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Event: Central Circuit Time Attack Challenge 2018 V.2

Continuing coverage from Central Circuit, we’ll take a look at the podium finishers of the day, and a few of the close runner-ups.  While most everyone in the Vertex classes were quick, I was surprised at where some of the cars landed on the time sheets.  I think my perception of who was fast at Central was a bit skewed from the events held in prior years.  If I’m not mistaken, Iwata took fastest lap a few years ago before he crashed the EG at TC2000.  Seems like the Kansai guys have been doing their homework recently though.

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Event: Central Circuit Time Attack Challenge 2018 V.1

The days leading up to this event were spent in somewhat of a rush to compile my projects at work so I could afford some time to do a bit of research on Central Circuit, and the event itself.  This would be the first time attending CTAC for both Sekinei and I, and I wanted to have at least an elementary grasp of the track layout and event schedule.  It may seem dramatic, but when I’m presented with a finite amount of time to photograph something comprehensively, I get a bit anxious.  With the top class getting 3 sessions comprised of 15 minutes each, you can’t afford to be isolated from the action for even a minute.  With some of the fastest drivers gathered from all of Japan, I was looking forward to seeing what the day had in store.