Category: Action

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Encounter: &G Corporation Time Attack SW20

Located in central Kasai, in the heart of the Hyogo Prefecutre, surrounded by farmland lies the small tuning shop, &G Corporation.  Specializing in aftermarket tuning of Toyota and Nissan applications, it’s only fit that the car that flies the shop’s flag is this very unique MR2.  The owner and driver, Nakajima-san, has commissioned the car in open events for a very long time now, but for the past few years, the car has been developed rather dramatically.

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Close-Up: Yusuke Tokue – The Vanguard of FF

The Garage Work camp has been hard at work on several of their shop cars for the 2018 season.  Iwata has chosen to put his personal build aside in order to concentrate on the advancement of a few select customers; which is a somewhat noble, but necessary thing to do when you own your own tuning shop.  The dedication is paying off though, as all 3 of the cars they have competing have broken personal records.  One of them stands out among the rest, however, and it all started last year when he broke a very important record at Tsukuba.

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Event: Central Circuit Time Attack Challenge 2018 V.2

Continuing coverage from Central Circuit, we’ll take a look at the podium finishers of the day, and a few of the close runner-ups.  While most everyone in the Vertex classes were quick, I was surprised at where some of the cars landed on the time sheets.  I think my perception of who was fast at Central was a bit skewed from the events held in prior years.  If I’m not mistaken, Iwata took fastest lap a few years ago before he crashed the EG at TC2000.  Seems like the Kansai guys have been doing their homework recently though.

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Feature: HKS TRB-03 – The Tsukuba Maverick

There’s no doubt that, in Japanese motor sport, one name stands out among the rest.  In almost everything they do, they need to be on top.  The fastest, the most advanced.  HKS will stop at nothing to collect these titles, and the TRB-03 has become their newest vessel to achieve them.  The company has enveloped it’s priority in the project with the goal of being nothing less than the fastest around Tsukuba’s TC2000.  It was even re-branded as the ‘Tsukuba Record Breaker’, from it’s original designation as the GTS800; a tip of the hat to it’s capped power level (which is debatable…).  The car has been through extensive testing over the past year, and last weekend at HKS Day, I was able to finally get a closer look at it.

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Event: Central Circuit Time Attack Challenge 2018 V.1

The days leading up to this event were spent in somewhat of a rush to compile my projects at work so I could afford some time to do a bit of research on Central Circuit, and the event itself.  This would be the first time attending CTAC for both Sekinei and I, and I wanted to have at least an elementary grasp of the track layout and event schedule.  It may seem dramatic, but when I’m presented with a finite amount of time to photograph something comprehensively, I get a bit anxious.  With the top class getting 3 sessions comprised of 15 minutes each, you can’t afford to be isolated from the action for even a minute.  With some of the fastest drivers gathered from all of Japan, I was looking forward to seeing what the day had in store.

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Encounter: Shark Attack – Hiroyuki’s Naturally Aspirated FD3S

In a clutch drive at the end of last year, Hiroyuki ‘Shark’ Iiri set a new track record for the naturally aspirated, rear-wheel drive class with a blistering 55.887 lap around TC2000.  Considering that this project hasn’t been in development for very long in comparison to some other builds gives you an idea of both the talent that Hiroyuki has behind the wheel, and the people involved in making this car what it is.  I’m looking forward to getting some time in Hyogo this month to talk to him about the car a little more in-depth.  For now enjoy some photos from the record-breaking day.

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Feature: The Future of Time Attack – Yasuhiro Ando’s RX-7

I recently read a somewhat contradictory article published on a popular website that surmised that there were no longer interesting cars in Japanese time attack, and how there has been a split in interest as nobody wants to build record setting cars any longer.  The article goes on by saying that while there are still plenty of mid-50 second cars at Tsukuba (ahem, breaking records), this lack of general interest in being the fastest is allowing companies to take advantage of a new market that caters to the hobbyist.  Of course this is an opinionated perception, albeit factually incorrect, and naturally everyone is entitled to their opinion, but it takes just a few minutes to see the holes in this side of the argument.