Category: Feature

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Feature: Amir Bentatou – The RS Future K20 NSX

There is no doubt that the shear excitement of driving a purpose-built race car on the edge is enough for any driver to justify the money and work that gets put into building it.  Although, surprisingly there are very few people that understand the actual amount of work that goes into building a race car; Amir Bentatou is not one of those people.

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Feature: The Temple of Buddha – Golden Bathurst R-3 FD3S

This 1995 Mazda RX-7, owned by someone choosing only to be referred to as ‘The Temple of Buddha’ (or something like that I don’t actually know), is so far off the grid that I normally operate on that when I saw it at Fuji the other week, I had to take a closer look.

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Feature: Garage G-Force – The Evolution of the Yamazaki IX

A prominent influence in the Mitsubishi tuning domain, Garage G-Force has spent the last decade fighting to solidify a name for themselves as the number-one Evolution tuning company in Japan.  That fight, however, hasn’t been easy.

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Feature: Military Standard – Philip Robles Time Attack EG6

Without a doubt, Philip Robles has become a household name in the time attack scene around the Southwestern US. Having competed in a wide variety of sanctioned events throughout Arizona and California over the past several years, he has solidified his place among motor sport’s most dedicated drivers.

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Feature: Hiroshi Shimada – Southern Style CT9A

In the heart of Winter this year, I made the trek down to Kyushu to attend Autopolis Superlap.  Unbeknownst to me (because it happened when I was in-flight from Tokyo to Kumamoto) the event had been cancelled due to excessive snowfall in the area.  For the past week, the likelihood of the event taking place was always brought into question.

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Feature: Advancing Passion – Takanori Seyama’s GTR32

Takanori Seyama has never been one to turn away from a challenge; choosing to define himself by his hard work and willingness to sail through uncharted waters on his own.  His hard work has proven itself in the fabrication of his GTR32, which has crowned itself among the fastest Skyline’s in Japan.

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Feature: Northern Exposure – The GNR Racing EK9

The evolution of time attack builds in Japan is, for me, one of the most enjoyable aspects of the sport.  The dedication of the teams and the drivers to improve performance each season typically results in a year over year change in the appearance of the cars.  Especially given the fact that most of the Attack competitors are ghosts on social media in comparison, it’s always a surprise to see what they unveil at the start of each season.

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Feature: The Casual Race Car – NDF B20 Spec DC2

At some point in time, my friend Duane mentioned to a few of us that, barring interest, he was thinking of starting a spec-B20 class within the VTEC Club events.  As you can imagine, it was an idea that didn’t catch on too quick.  In fact, anybody we mentioned it to had a decent laugh at our expense.  B20’s, in their stock form, don’t have the greatest appeal in the realm of racing Hondas, so the idea that enough people would want to be involved to even warrant it’s own class was comical at best.  Boy, were they all wrong.

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Feature: Third Times A Charm – The JDM Yard EG6

Winning just one first place trophy, for any class, in the World Time Attack Challenge would be a lifetime achievement for most people.  Claiming two would be a way to show the world that it wasn’t a fluke.  However, taking that top podium spot three times would undoubtedly leave a mark on the time attack world that not many teams can achieve.  A true champion can prove that they have what it takes to keep winning;  evolving to meet new challenges.  That’s precisely what the guys at JDM Yard have done.

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Feature: The 86 Progression – Keiichi Tsuchiya

One of the more anticipated cars of this year’s WTAC among fans and builders alike, had to be Beau Yates’ revamped AE86.  With Mark Bissett leading the team, the car was built at Hypertune in Sydney, and has been entirely stripped of it’s former drift specification and rebuilt as a time attack car fit for a king; and by king, I mean none other than Keiichi Tsuchiya.  Keiichi was slated to drive the car in Open Class this year at Sydney Motorsports Park.

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Feature: Takanori Seyama – A Restrained Potential

From the time I began to take an interest in Japanese Time Attack, I’ve had the chance to see Takanori Seyama’s R32 evolve year after year, slowly transforming into one of the countries fastest GTR’s.  With that one fact being known, you’d think that the car would be a household name for fans of the sport.  However, Takanori keeps such a low profile that the exposure of his build doesn’t quite hit the reach that others do.  It’s a testament to his humble character that, despite knocking on the door of 53’s, he’s a frontrunner that tends to stay in the shadows.

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Feature: In Good Company – Masaki Kitajo’s FD3S

It seems to be about every 2 years or so I have the opportunity to check in with Masaki-san.  A staple of the Attack community, Masaki’s FD has served as his test bed and company demo car for nearly a decade, and continues to evolve year after year.  I remember seeing it for the first time back in 2012 at Tsukuba during Advan’s ‘Fastest Amateur Tournament’.  Back then the car had a full FEED Afflux kit and was comparatively very mild looking.  Oh how far we’ve come…

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Feature: HKS TRB-03 – The Tsukuba Maverick

There’s no doubt that, in Japanese motor sport, one name stands out among the rest.  In almost everything they do, they need to be on top.  The fastest, the most advanced.  HKS will stop at nothing to collect these titles, and the TRB-03 has become their newest vessel to achieve them.  The company has enveloped it’s priority in the project with the goal of being nothing less than the fastest around Tsukuba’s TC2000.  It was even re-branded as the ‘Tsukuba Record Breaker’, from it’s original designation as the GTS800; a tip of the hat to it’s capped power level (which is debatable…).  The car has been through extensive testing over the past year, and last weekend at HKS Day, I was able to finally get a closer look at it.

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Event: Central Circuit Time Attack Challenge 2018 V.1

The days leading up to this event were spent in somewhat of a rush to compile my projects at work so I could afford some time to do a bit of research on Central Circuit, and the event itself.  This would be the first time attending CTAC for both Sekinei and I, and I wanted to have at least an elementary grasp of the track layout and event schedule.  It may seem dramatic, but when I’m presented with a finite amount of time to photograph something comprehensively, I get a bit anxious.  With the top class getting 3 sessions comprised of 15 minutes each, you can’t afford to be isolated from the action for even a minute.  With some of the fastest drivers gathered from all of Japan, I was looking forward to seeing what the day had in store.

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Feature: A Test of Time – Hiroshi Amemiya’s Garage Mak S15

I had the real pleasure of shooting Ame’s car underneath the Yokohama Bay Bridge back in 2014 before the Winter Cafe.  Back then we had talked a bit online, but that was the first time I met him in person, and being a bit humbled at the time, wasn’t really up to asking many questions.  Since then, I’ve been lucky enough to stay in touch, and continue our friendship from a distance. The car has also undergone some fairly dramatic changes, so when I visited Nagano at the end of last year, I jumped at the chance to photograph the car again in it’s evolved state.  This time, I had the intentions of re-writing an article not just about the car, but about the owner as well.

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Feature: The Future of Time Attack – Yasuhiro Ando’s RX-7

I recently read a somewhat contradictory article published on a popular website that surmised that there were no longer interesting cars in Japanese time attack, and how there has been a split in interest as nobody wants to build record setting cars any longer.  The article goes on by saying that while there are still plenty of mid-50 second cars at Tsukuba (ahem, breaking records), this lack of general interest in being the fastest is allowing companies to take advantage of a new market that caters to the hobbyist.  Of course this is an opinionated perception, albeit factually incorrect, and naturally everyone is entitled to their opinion, but it takes just a few minutes to see the holes in this side of the argument.

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NDF Build: NDF TA Civic Rebuild V.7

It seems like ages since I’ve driven my car, and at the pace that life seems to be moving recently that wouldn’t even be an exaggeration.  It’s been well over two years since I’ve written of any progress (publicly – I keep a notebook), and just about a year and a half since I’ve driven the thing.  I can honestly say, however, that over the past 6 months there hasn’t been a day that I wasn’t focused on finishing this build.  In these past two years I’ve learned more about the nuances specific to building Honda’s than I have in my entire life; from engine building and wiring to fabrication and fluid dynamics.  It hasn’t been easy, but thankfully I have some amazingly talented friends that have helped along the way.

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Feature: Against The Grain – Igarashi-San’s GTR33

Of all the different types of Nissan chassis’s competing in time attack around the world, it’s fairly rare to see the GTR33 among them.  It’s definitely the lesser of the chosen Skyline models for road racing, and if I’m speaking honestly, I’m not overly sure why.  It is a bit heavier than the 32, but not too far off of the 34.  It’s longer wheelbase leaves it prone to a bit more understeer, and some might say it’s lacking in the looks department (now that I list the reasons, I see why).  Perhaps the R33 was just born to be the middle-child; loved, but not destined to be a favorite.  There are some people, however, that refuse to believe the popular mindset, and work outward from the R33’s positive traits to create something so overtly great, you can’t help but like it.

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Feature: The Finer Things – Garage Mak GTR35

There are few companies these days that go out of their way to cultivate a culture of quality.  Unfortunately, it’s all too common for people to squeeze out as much profit as possible from mediocre products, sacrificing integrity for a quick buck.  While it may be the more difficult route, those companies that are dedicated to ensuring the experience of buying and owning a product goes further than just fulfilling a desire, are the companies that are likely to be around for years to come.  The Nagano based tuning shop, Garage Mak, falls into this category, ensuring that the reputation of their brand comes before all else.

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Feature: Bringing The Fire – Yoshiki Ando’s ESCORT Built CT9A

I feel like ever since the Cyber Evo set the standard for what a successful attack EVO should be, Mitsubishi devotees have been trying to redefine the level of what is considered top tier.  Average power levels have risen, aerodynamics play a much larger role now, and tuning has come such a long way in the past decade that it’s almost hard to keep up.  Even the Cyber Evo wasn’t immune to the changes; in the 2011 to 2012 transition, in order to defend their title, Takizawa turned to C-West in hopes of gaining an advantage in aerodynamics without unbalancing the winning formula they had.  Competition in the sport was advancing so quickly that it soon became apparent that if you weren’t improving, you were for sure going to be left behind.

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Feature: Defining Simplicity – Shoutarou’s Attack DC5

In the realm of time attack, most often than not, the phrase ‘less is more’ can be aptly applied in most circumstances (I think power and tire size being the exception). Even those competing in street cars forgo the extra amenities in favor of shedding overall weight in their car; a willing sacrifice if it means quicker times. More and more we see entries into the sport that push the boundaries of limited modifications; some even entering the circuit with untouched motors. Such is the case with Shoutarou and his Integra – a pair that push simplicity to it’s limit.

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Feature: Shinobu Matayoshi – TFR AHW FD3S

One of my favorite things to do on my down time is research time attack builds in Japan.  It’s akin to that of a treasure hunt for me.  I enjoy the prospect of being among the first to find out about certain aspects of the build, and to both share it through the website and take inspiration from them for my own builds.  There is still a large gap between the publicization of builds in Japan versus that of builds in Western countries, and because of this, information can be very difficult to come across sometimes.  I think that’s what makes it interesting for me though; and this same theme plays true in other aspects of life as well.  The harder you work towards something, the more satisfaction it brings you.

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Feature: Hiroyoshi Shimada – The Soul of Kyushu Danji

The concept of forming an amateur race team is something that appeals to quite a few of us.  Aside from the obvious attraction of building race cars with your friends, there’s the added benefits of friendly competition, commradery and support among teammates; turns out there’s more positives to emulating Initial D than just looking cool.  As a result we see attempts of this springing up all over the world – some good, some not so good.  While we may have a ways to go on this side of the Pacific in making names for ourselves, no one in Japan does it better than the boys from Kyushu – ‘Kyushu Danji’; quite possibly the most notable and dedicated, time attack team in Japan.

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Feature: A Man And His Car(s) – Masao Otani

I first became acquainted with Masao Otani back in 2014 when he attended our Attack Meeting in Doitsu Mura, Chiba.  He had brought his 180 to the gathering which, 3 years ago, looked much more tame than it does now.  That was back when the Attack community felt a little tighter knit than it does today, given the recent popularity increase.  Which isn’t to be taken as a negative; with growth comes sacrifice in some areas, and the truth is that there are a lot more people involved in the sport today.  Later that year, Masao and I had the fortune of connecting again through some mutual friends, and actually began talking quite regularly.

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Feature: Masumoto Shoichiro – The Shorin GTR32

If you had the opportunity to meet Masumoto just once, then it would go without saying that he is the definition of someone who lives for circuit racing.  The energy that he resonates around the track is that of true happiness and excitement to be doing what he does.  Over the past few years he has helped the Attack series grow into something much more than just a private, invite only track event.  The fact that Attack is now a recognized championship series throughout Japan is thanks in part to Masumoto-san’s hard work and dedication.  His personal GTR build has paralleled his work with Attack, and provides him the outlet he needs to channel his energy.

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Feature: All In A Day’s Work – Chiba’s EK Frontrunners

Something happened last month that honestly didn’t get the recognition it deserved; at least from publications that I frequent.  In hindsight I probably should have made it more of a priority to highlight the news on my end other than social media, but in my defense I was busy with work and part of me wanted to wait until I talked to a few people about it.  When a guy like Suzuki Under breaks records it’s, because of his amassed following, it’s pretty easy to hear information about it.  I remember when he clocked the 50.746 back in December everyone I knew was talking about it; and rightly so, it’s amazing.  So when I heard that during last month’s Attack Tsukuba Championship, Yusuke had broken the 57 second barrier to clock a lap time of 56.748 I thought the internet would explode.

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Feature: Soaring Progression – AutoBahn’s Carbon JZZ30

Without a doubt the most interesting thing for me, in following Japanese Time Attack so closely, is getting to see the progression of builds over an extended period of time.  We all know that building a race car isn’t a quick task, and for most people at the grassroots level it’s a trial and error procedure; you find out what works and what doesn’t from your initial base, and head back to the drawing board after each event.  Everyone has their own method of going about this, but the common goal for everyone, however, is to go faster.

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Feature: Ryo Kaneko – Yellow Factory EG6

It’s always refreshing to me to see productivity in it’s most energetic form.  I think their are many positive effects to being constructive and it seems to me that it is overlooked quite often.  It’s an aspect of life that adds a great deal of meaning to what we choose to pursue.  Instinctively knowing the difference between being busy and being productive gives us the ability to progress through life much more efficiently; ultimately allowing us to experience more, and get the most out of our time.  Ryo Kaneko is a man who knows the benefits of productive living, and it shows through his work on the circuit.

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Feature: Occupy Fuji – Morita’s Dominant CP9A

About two years ago I stumbled across Morita-san’s EVO browsing through Minkara; although at the time, I only knew him by his internet handle ‘Hanipon’.  I had never seen an EVO 6 as aggressive as his, and after exploring his build a little further, instantly became a fan.  Suffice to say I was a little shocked when he reached out to me randomly in an email at the beginning of the year.  We exchanged a few words, I sent him some decals, and as some things happen to work out, he was able to make the drive down from Saitama to attend our FRSxNDF meeting last month.  Never one to pass on opportunity, we scheduled a photo shoot at Fuji shortly after.  I was already impressed with the presence of this build online, but it was nothing compared to what the car looks like in person.

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Feature: Ito Atsushi’s Tamon Design FC3S

I feel that the aftermarket companies that support older chassis don’t get enough credit. To produce new parts for an application that is constantly diminishing in population isn’t something easily committed to.  It takes a dedication, and a love for motor sport, to appeal to these cars.  As time passes, because we’re so enthralled by the cars of the 80’s and 90’s, we don’t recognize just how old some of these cars are.  The FC, for example, made it’s debut in 1985; celebrating it’s 30th birthday just last year.  Appreciating the everlasting potential of these cars is something worth noting, and Atsushi-san of Shizuoka does just that with his Tamon Designs clad RX7.

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Feature: The Semblance of GT – Jun Tanaka’s Silvia S15

Finding originality among the masses these days seems almost like a lost cause; difficult to say the least.  It seems we’ve fallen into an echo-chamber, driven by internet popularity, that promotes the trendy favorable over imagination.  Very few choose to forge their own path of innovation and ingenuity, and it’s left us with more ‘inspired by’ designs than one should have to endure.  This sheep-like quality is absent in Mr. Jun Tanaka, however, and the S15 that he’s created is unlike any other.

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Archives: No Stone Unturned – K2 Racing RX8

There’s nothing quite like seeing a chassis pushed to it’s very limit.  Regardless of make, model and drive-train, watching a car get transformed into a full fledged circuit machine is one of my favorite pleasures in this medium.  It’s not something that happens often, and a lot of times (based on a plethora of factors) people end up settling; believe me when I tell you, I know all too well.  So when a shop takes the gloves off on a build, it’s something I get excited about.  In the case of this RX-8, K2 Racing takes Mazda’s last rendition of the Renesis to it’s peak, and maybe just a little bit further.

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Feature: Team Driver – Justin Yoo’s AP2

If you follow the blog (or Instagram @naritadogfight), it’s likely that you have heard of Justin, or seen his car posted several times.  Justin is one of the two team drivers we have on NDF, and while he’s made several appearances (like the Podcast interview, and a few cameos) I’ve never really gone out and shot his S2000 with the purpose of featuring it.  The car has come a long way in the past few months with the assistance of some pretty weighty modifications.  This past weekend, we took to the streets with the idea of showcasing his build for the site.

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Close-Up: More Power, More Speed – Auto Works K2 Racing RX-8

The rotary specialists at Auto Works K2 have recently begun producing the framework for a SE3P that will, without a doubt, take the Time Attack scene by storm.  The shop’s new flagship made it’s debut at Mazda Fest last week and was able to get some solid lap times in on TC2000. The chassis, acquired by a customer directly from RE Amemiya, used to serve as RE’s old D1 car.  With the Summer downtime between seasons in Japan, the shop has already started the car’s transformation to a full time attack build; consider this post as a preview to a full article.  Matt is scheduled to shoot the car next week and we’ll have a full feature on Attack’s newest competitor soon.  Check out the pictures past the break.

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Feature: The Pleasure of Drive – CCE FD3S

In the furthest Southeastern part of the Saitama prefecture lies the small commuter town of Misato City.  The suburb that serves as home to many employees of Tokyo, also serves as the headquarters for CCE; a fairly new, by some standards, tuning shop that offers a one-stop option for a variety of cars.  The president, Yoshihiro Nakamura, chose this FD3S to serve as the companies flagship build.  It’s gone through minor changes each year for the past several years, but I think that it’s current state is one that strikes a good balance between street and track; a goal that many enthusiasts in Japan strive for.

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Feature: Less is More – Makoto’s Garage Work EK4

I messaged Makoto today to catch up and inquire about some things I’ve been waiting on from Garage Work.  I realized that, out of all the spotlights on Garage Work cars I’ve posted, I never really posted much about his EK4. We got to chatting about his car and what he’s working towards with it.  As you would imagine, his build is another prime example of the ‘less is more’ mentality that comes out of the Chiba outfit.

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Feature: Everything’s Fun – Masao Otani’s 180SX

The beauty of being involved in a global hobby is that you get the opportunity to connect with a multitude of awesome people.  I’m fortunate that the majority of them come from simply supporting the website; I need not travel further than my inbox to find a handful. I try to answer everyone in a timely manner, but sometimes I get really backed up.  It just so happens though, that this week I’ve been held captive in my own home due to knee surgery.  While the inability to move has it’s downsides, it has allowed me to catch up with correspondence.  This weekend I was able to chat with Masao Otani, a resident of Chiba who happens to be associated with a mutual friend of mine.  I’ve been following his build for awhile now, but until we talked, I had no idea just how parallel his mindset was with that of NDF.

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Feature: Yusuke Tokue’s EK4 – The FF Frontrunner

There’s a small community of time attack drivers in Japan that dedicate themselves to the FF base; a chassis that has, arguably, many more challenges to overcome on track than it’s counterpart.  Despite the handicap that these cars have initially, to the people who have devoted their time and knowledge into producing the best, the joy that comes along with victory outweighs any doubt of potential.  As is the case with all Garage Work cars, and especially so for Yusuke Tokue and his EK4.